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The Wii (pronounced like english word 'we') is Nintendo's fifth generation gaming console. Nintendo's prior gaming consoles (excluding handhelds) include the Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), Super NES, Nintendo 64 and the Gamecube. The Wii is the next gaming system step after the GameCube and is somewhat based on the GameCube architecture. The Wii released in the US on September 14, 2006 to much fanfare and sellouts. Since then, the Wii has remained as hard to obtain as it was the day of release.

Core Demographic Edit

Much like the GameCube (and previous Nintendo systems), Nintendo focuses its core gaming goals on family style gaming. Most games are both family and child friendly. As a result, the Wii has made a lot of inroads into the family and is less widely used by hardcore gamers.

Technology Edit

Nintendo updated the Wii's core technology from the GameCube to be more Internet friendly and, at the same time, added a much more innovative and interactive controller system using the sensor bar and the Wiimote. The controller system is a multi-part system:

  • Sensor Bar
  • Wiimote
  • Nunchuk

Sensor BarEdit

The Sensor Bar reads the location of the Wiimote in space via infrared. A secondary Bluetooth link carries audio information to the Wiimote (for the Wiimote speaker) and also carries button presses and other information to the Wii from the Wiimote.

WiimoteEdit

The Wiimote, also called the Wii Remote, is designed to be a fully wireless wand-style remote. Nintendo decided to abandon the traditional all-in-one two handed style controller for an updated spacially detected wand-style remote. The Wiimote offers some advantages over the older controller style in that it allows for much more accurate placement in space (because of the Sensor Bar) and also feels better in the hand when playing sports games that have paddle, racket or stick type controls. The Wiimote offers a digital control pad (d-pad) and several other buttons. The primary gaming button of choice is the A button.

NunchukEdit

The Nunchuk is a wired extension that connects into the Wiimote. This extension adds an analog control stick and a few other buttons for games that require two handed button control.

Both the Wiimote and the Nunchuk have accelerometers that detect speed and distance to more accurately determine velocity of an in-game item (such as a bowling ball or a baseball pitch).

Graphics Edit

The Wii doesn't boast the best gaming graphics today. Both the Xbox 360 and the PS3 offer superior graphics subsystems to the Wii. What sells the Wii is both the demographic to which the games are targeted combined with the innovative sensor bar technology. The graphics top out at 480p if connected to an HDTV. So, while it can do widescreen, you shouldn't expect the crisp sharp gaming experience of an Xbox 360 or a PS3.

Difficult to obtain Edit

Since the introduction of the Wii in 2006, it has been extremely difficult to find a Wii in stores. It's not that they're not being made, it's that the stores continually sell out of them. The best solution to finding a Wii is to locate a bundle. Bundles typically cost more money to obtain than a Wii alone, but you have a better chance of finding a bundle in stock than finding a Wii alone.

If you absolutely must find a Wii by itself, then your best bet is to call a store each morning before you leave for work and ask if they have any. Most places won't hold them for you, however, so expect to drive over when you find one.

Buzz Out Loud ReferencesEdit


External Links Edit

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